Western Hemlock

Western Hemlock

Western Hemlock wood (Tsuga heterophylla) is largest of the hemlock species.

Western Hemlock

Commonly found in northwest coast of North America, western hemlock is the largest of the hemlocks, and is one of the most valuable sources of lumber in northern hemisphere. The wood species is also the state tree of Washington.

Compared to eastern hemlock (Tsuga canadensis), Western Hemlock wood has usually narrower growth rings, even though both wood species can have tightly spaced growth rings. The Western Hemlock trees grow to 200 feet tall (50 to 60 meters) with average tree trunk of 3 to 5 feet in diameter (1 to 1.5 meters). The wood has a .45 specific gravity (density), 540 lbs in hardness, 11,300 ps in bending strength with around 1,630 kps in bending stiffness.

Western hemlock has light reddish brown heartwood. Sapwood may be somewhat lighter in color but usually isn’t distinguished from the heartwood. Sporadically have dark streaks caused by bark maggots. The noticeable growth rings can exhibit interesting grain patterns on flat-sawn surfaces. The species is usually straight grain, with a coarse, uneven texture.

Western hemlock’s working properties are good. The disparity between the soft earlywood and the hard latewood makes sanding create dips and uneven surfaces. Western hemlock wood works well with glues, stains, and finishes.

Liberty Cedar is one of the leading quality western hemlock wood suppliers in Rhode Island, Massachusetts, Long Island, New York, and Connecticut region. Visit Liberty Cedar and see our high quality western hemlock supplies.